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Recognising members of the Lieutenancy

The sash of a male Lord-Lieutenant

Members of the Lieutenancy carrying out official duties on formal occasions will usually wear distinctive badges of office to signify their positions.

Female Lord-Lieutenants wear a decorative, easily identifiable badge of office (shown left and, right, as worn by Mrs Pyper, the Lord-Lieutenant of West Sussex). The enamelled badge depicts the Tudor rose surmounted by a crown outlined with pearls, on a court bow of the Lieutenancy colours, white and magenta.

Male Lord-Lieutenants wear a formal military-style uniform (as shown by the Lord-Lieutenant of East Sussex, below right), which is a dark blue uniform in the style of an Army General Officer's No. 1 dress (but with buttons, shoulder-boards, sash etc. in silver rather than gold). A cap is worn, and a sword with a steel scabbard. The sash (below centre) is in the Lieutenancy colours of magenta and white.

The badge on a male Lord-Lieutenant's cap (left) varies depending on where the Lieutenant's county is situated: a rose is worn in England, shamrocks in Northern Ireland, a thistle in Scotland and Prince-of-Wales feathers in Wales.

Deputy Lieutenants (DLs) performing duties on behalf of the Lord-Lieutenant wear the enamelled badge shown (below left).

 

 

The badge of a lady Lord-Lieutenant

The uniform cap badge of a male Lord-Lieutenant

The uniform cap badge of a male Lord-Lieutenant

The badge of office of a Deputy Lieutenant of West Sussex  worn on official duties

The badge of office of a

Deputy Lieutenant of West Sussex  worn on official duties

The Lord-Lieuteant of West Sussex, Mrs Susan Pyper

 

The badge of a lady Lord-Lieuteant